Head First: the hardest word...

Tuesday, October 09, 2007

the hardest word...

Check this out:

18 comments:

Jason said...

I'm sorry I didn't think of this first...and that we don't "party anymore."

John Smulo said...

Thanks for the support! Look for checking out your bloggity blog.

Zeke said...

Brilliant. I posted one, though I could have posted a thousand.

Kc said...

It's only pride that won't let us seek the forgivness that we all need so often. This seems like a great idea. I wonder if there is a "thank you" site too.

Thank you Dorse, for who you are and all you do!
;-)

Rich/Luthsem said...

Confession is good for the soul.
I need to confess daily.

tkn said...

That's a good site. Thanks for the tip.

sandytrif said...

I have visited the site. Thanks for sharing it with us. I only hope that I can live showing the true Christ to others. Sandy

SocietyVs said...

That was an awesome site - great to see humility is still part of the values of the gospel we read. Man, that was a good read.

Caro said...

SORRY guys, but I am not impressed with the site. It seems that each of us "sorry Christians" would do better to contact the one we wronged face-to-face and there show our sorrow and humility by asking their forgiveness.
What is done by posting an "I'm sorry" on the internet? Does this reach the wronged one? Does it make me feel better w/o costing me anything but a moment at the keyboard?
If I had a nickel for everytime I needed to say "I'm sorry", I'd be rich. If I actually said it to the person(s), I'd be far richer!

RF2R2 said...

caro,

Relax. It's like, christian PR - it may not get very much reconciliation done on a personal level, but it may make a big difference to someone who might otherwise think every christian is the same asshole that did them wrong. On a corporate level, I think it is an act of humility as well - a reminder of how ridiculous our sins sound to the lost could actually go a long way toward helping a christian make those first steps to a personal apology.

Recovering said...

I think the website is a good idea - although many of the "apolgies" made me very uncomfortable. I feel somwhere inbetween Caro and rf2r2 on this one...

jeff said...

Caro said:
If I had a nickel for everytime I needed to say "I'm sorry", I'd be rich. If I actually said it to the person(s), I'd be far richer!

I recently experienced this in having to apologize when I didn't really want to. There was a tremendous freedom in that...

In reading through these apologies, I'm sure most were genuine. Of course, many were probably doing it because they thought it was blog-chic or post-modern or it reminded them of Jay Bakker's apology stickers... who knows?!? I guess only God can judge it...

Pretty okay, imho.

pecheur said...

Just following up on a previous conversation.

You were right. Jesus would not have played rugby for France. His team would have won their games, unlike the French.

have a great day!!

Caro said...

rf2r2
OK, PR usually is BS, but I'll give you that one.
I don't get the corporate bit at all. How does my sounding ridiculous help me become able to apologize? Seems that it might make me realize only how silly my "Christian" issues are. However, that realization might help me lighten up on myself, thereby giving me more freedom to express love and be less self-centered

Rock in the Grass said...

OK: this is a bit like a Christian "wailing wall". Here is a place for public prayers of confession. But this is just one step in restitution. Having said the public prayer, we now need to leave the site determined to be different; then go to the person we have wronged and seek to repair the damage.

Molly's Boss said...

I do not think it is always healthy to say “I sorry” when in fact you are not and perhaps should not be. When I go to this web sight I see things that are issues that people are claiming “I’m sorry” and asking for forgiveness for when perhaps even Jesus would not ask for forgiveness. I did not see Jesus asking for forgiveness when He overturned the tables in His Father’s house of prayer. I do not see him say, “I’m sorry”, when he addressed the Sadducees or Pharisees. I do not see the Father saying, “I’m sorry”, when in Revelations the scroll is being read and the trumpets are sounding and the terror of the bowls are being released. That said however, yes, I am sure that there are many infractions in this world that cause harm that are done “In the name of God”. I.E. when I see Erin say on the site “He is not a man of rules nor a God of anger, He is the ultimate and perfect expression of unconditional love and acceptance…” I may have issue with this statement. Question… what are you being saved from? In John 3:36 it says “He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life: and he that believeth not the Son shall not see life; but the wrath of God abideth on him.” Go to any bible on computer and key in the word wrath and you might want to adjust the statement that “He is not a God of anger”. I would agree with Erin to this degree… He is a God of righteous that will one day judge all. However if I were to believe in Erin’s statement entirely it may diminish in me the proper “fear” of God. I truly do believe there is a proper “fear” of God, but I would also agree that may not give me ultimate privilege to impose this belief on you. However, having raised children to adulthood there are a few things I may need to apologize for, there are other things that I may be sorry for because they may not have met with the best outcome but I do not think that an “I’m sorry” is required because it came from a statement of truth from a loving father and needed to be said at the time to add correction to the child. Question… If we walk around in total “acceptance” of those things we know cause harm of what should we be “apologizing” for?

dorsey said...

I don't think the point is to make a judgement about someone's apology. I think the point is that some people feel as if, somewhere along the line, they missed the point, themselves. This site is merely a venue for the acknowledgment of such.

Personally, I think a person can apologize for just about anything, if he/she feels they need to, whether anyone else thinks so or not. My departure from church happened because of actions that were beyond my control. Nevertheless, I felt responsible for the kids who were abandoned and wounded as a result. Whether it was my fault or not, letting them know that I hurt for/with them was beneficial.

"I am sorry that my need to be right made me miss that I should have loved you instead."

I don't know a Christian (especially myself) who doesn't need to apologize for that one.

Molly's Boss said...

I see your point and it is a very good one. However I would just issue one caution. In the statement, "I am sorry that my need to be right made me miss that I should have loved you instead." How are you reading this? Am I apologizing for… my need to be right…? If you are talking about a relationship such as a marriage partner this could be very legit and an apology may be in order. However, if you put the Lord in the mix and are talking about my relationship with the Lord, I may have a need to have the proper “fear” of the Lord and then my need to be “right” and live as righteous a life that I can is very important to me. I may have to rid myself of people in my life to where I would have taken “drugs” with or frequent the “bars” with in neglect of my family. To them I do not see where any apology is necessary. However, if you are talking about the fact that I let legalisms get in the way of loving my family or a Christian brother, then you have a very good point. But the issue of apologizing is not for “the need to be right” or live as righteous a life that I can as much as I devalued our relationship so that my selfish ambition of wanting you to “conform to the image of my agenda” got in the way of our relationship. If we are all “brothers” attempting to do what is “right” in the Lord then, again, perhaps you statement holds. But at the same time, if you gave me the authority of “a brother with accountability” in your life then there are grounds where these issues may come into conflict. At that point it may not be “conform to the image of my agenda” that would be of concern but “conforming to the image of His son”. If I see a brother walking away from his family into areas he should not go is it more loving to let him go or to attempt to do something about it? The Lord may put a “firm” counselor in this man’s live as well as a loving one. If I were the “firm” counselor does that mean I should later apologize to you? It may mean that I need to say, “I’m sorry we had to go through that” but this is not the same as saying “I’m sorry for all things …” I think the more proper statement would be "I am sorry that my need to have you conform to the image of my agenda made me miss that I should have loved you instead." The Lord tell us all to work our own salvation with Him in fear and trembling. We all should be doing just that. My prayer is... Lord, if I can help a brother I will try, but Lord please do not let me be found meddling where You do not want me to go.

If I am found there then I'm sure I do owe my brother an "I'm sorry."